CARLO MOLLINO: POLAROIDS, ETC (1962-1973)

  In a career that spanned more than four decades, Carlo Mollino designed buildings, homes, furniture, cars, aircraft. One of the most dashing figures of mid-century Italy, Mollino was famed for his design finesse and his elegant organicism. In 1949 he published an important book on photography: Message from the Darkroom. Sometime around 1960, he […]

Mike Brodie: “Tones of Dirt and Bone”

The images in Tones of Dirt and Bone were made between 2004 and 2006, with a Polaroid camera and Time Zero film. Brodie used the characteristics and limitations inherent to this type of camera and film to his advantage. The portraits he made are further enhanced by the peculiar color palette of the film. Due […]

COLITA: “SPAIN”

Isabel Steva Hernández, “Colita”, was born in Barcelona in 1940. After finishing her pre-university studies she moved to Paris to study at the Sorbonne. On her return to Barcelona, she learned the photographer’s trade from Oriol Maspons, Julio Ubiña and Xavier Miserachs. In 1962 she worked on the film “Los Tarantos” and became friendly with […]

The Lomax Collection: “American Folk”

The collection includes 400 snapshot photographs made in the course of sound recording expeditions carried out by John Avery Lomax, Alan Lomax, and Ruby Terrill Lomax, between 1934 and ca. 1950 for the Archive of American Folk-Song.    

BRAD ELTERMAN: “PAPARAZZO”

  Brad Elterman (American, b. 1956) is known for his photographs of the Hollywood rock’n’roll lifestyle, capturing such celebrities as Rod Steward, the Runaways, Bebe Buell, Kiss, Queen, and the Ramones,  (All rights reserved. Images @ Brad Elterman.)

SCOT SOTHERN: “LOWLIFE”

  Scot Sothern’s Lowlife is an illustrated memoir of dysfunction, a confession of a befuddled white guy maintaining a precarious connection to propriety and fatherhood while side-tripping into noirish infatuations. Sothern’s images, shot mostly in Southern California between 1986 and 1990, record the existence of these disenfranchised Americans, men and women, hawking souls for the […]

“WISCONSIN DEATH TRIP EXCERPTS”

  A selection of photographs produced by Charles Van Schaick between 1890 and 1910 that were used in the book Wisconsin Death Trip by Michael Lesy (1973). There are approximately 5,600 glass plates in the Charles Van Schaick collection preserved at the Wisconsin Historical Society and the Jackson County Historical Society.

Ed van der Elsken – “Love on the Left Bank” (1954)

  Dutch photographer and filmmaker Ed van der Elsken relocated to Paris in 1950. There he found a bohemian group and began closely following and photographing their everyday movements, intertwining fiction and reality in a new genre of photography book. The book focuses on the Left Bank of Paris at the time when the area was […]

Dash Snow: “Polaroids”

    Dash Snow originally started taking photos when he was a teenager. Using Polaroids as a diaristic record of the many ‘nights before’ he couldn’t remember, his snapshots piece together a fragmented portrait of Nihilistic existence.     ASX CHANNEL: DASH SNOW (All rights reserved. Images @ the Estate of Dash Snow)

Todd Hido: “House Hunting” (2001)

“Todd Hido’s large color photographs of suburbia are lonely, forlorn, mysterious… and strangely comforting. Hido photographs the interior rooms of repossessed tract homes, and the outsides of similar houses at night whose habitation is suggested by the glow of a television set or unseen overhead bulb. Seldom does the similar evoke such melancholy. Yet rather […]

Lee Friedlander: “The American Monument” (1976)

Vince Aletti describes The American Monument as “almost maniacally inclusive, rounding up everything from Plymouth Rock to a plaque commemorating the Pony Express in Salt Lake City and treating them with the same nonchalance. The doggedness of Friedlander’s quest is at once astounding and hilarious… History stalks the landscape at every turn.” The American Monument. […]

Jean Depara: “Kinshasa” (1951-1975)

  Lemvo Jean Abou Bakar Depara, known as Depara (1928–1997), was an Angolan-born photographer who worked in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Depara purchased his first video camera to record his wedding in 1950; four years later, he was made official photographer to the Zairian singer Franco. In 1975 he became official photographer to the […]

ISSEI SUDA: “NITIZYOU”

  Issei Suda was born in Tokyo in 1940 and graduated from the Tokyo College of Photography in 1962. He worked as a freelance photographer from 1971 and taught for many years at the Osaka University of Arts. (All rights reserved. @ Issei Suda.)

Araki Loves Polaroids

“The time when a picture is taken is like an emotion, it’s like a sexual encounter. It’s like a fuck! So, timing is very important.”

Araki’s Chiro, Yoko, Death and the Baring of a Soul

  In Sentimental Journey and later in Winter Journey Araki documented both the intimate and the mundane from his honeymoon and his wife’s terminal battle with cancer. By blurring the boundaries between life and art Araki’s work becomes uncomfortably candid, presenting death with a reverence as shocking and graphic as any of his more erotic […]

WALKER EVANS: “DRIVE-BY PICTURES”

Walker Evans, pictures taken from a moving automobile or train.   EXPLORE ALL WALKER EVANS ON ASX (© Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.)

MARGUERITE BAKER JOHNSON: “AMERICAN LIFE” (1952-1964)

Marguerite Baker Johnson, a native of Brussels Belgium was a noted female photographer noted as the first woman to take photographs inside the arena at “Cheyenne Frontier Days”, a task formerly conducted by men due to the dangerous setting. Her photos appeared in the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Automotive Periodicals, London Times, Daily Mirror, […]

Berenice Abbott – The Photographer of New York City

Berenice Abbott can be considered the photographer of New York City. A revolutionary documentary photographer, Abbott was born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1898, and studied for one year at Ohio State University, Columbus, before moving to New York in 1918.