William Eggleston, Mystagogue (1999)

 Do we care for anything but mystery? And does anything matter more than its apprehension? William Eggleston, Mystagogue, From 2 and 1/4. 1999. By Bruce Wagner Do we care for anything but mystery? And does anything matter more than its apprehension? During our days, we try so hard to find and hold it; at night, […]

Introduction to William Eggleston’s Guide (1976)

Sumner, Mississippi, Cassidy Bayou in background By John Szarkowski At this writing I have not yet visited Memphis, or northern Mississippi, and thus have no basis for judging how closely the photographs in this book might seem to resemble that part of the world and the life that is lived there. I have, however, visited […]

William Eggleston: ‘Draft of a Presentation’ (2003)

It’s hard for me to describe the fascination that William Eggleston’s photographs exert on me.   William Eggleston: Draft of a Presentation By Thomas Weski It’s hard for me to describe the fascination that William Eggleston’s photographs exert on me. More than twenty years ago, I bought William Eggleston’s Guide, the catalogue of his solo […]

WILLIAM EGGLESTON: “The Tender-Cruel Camera”

The choice of subject matter seemed to some critics to be totally indiscriminate, as though William Eggleston has applied no criteria at all.   William Eggleston: The Tender-Cruel Camera By Thomas Weski ‘I don’t particularly like what’s around me.’ I said that could be a good reason to take pictures. He said: ‘You know, that’s […]

Aaron Schuman: Slant Interview

“Reading through them, I realised that the best ones seemed to create a kind of mental-image in my mind’s eye – which due to the tone of the text often took the form of a very deadpan, monotone, and even monochrome photograph of a little scene in small-town America; I was imagining a very straightforward picture made by Walker Evans or Lee Friedlander or Diane Arbus or others, of four dogs sitting on top of a car, or a guy standing next to a tree in the middle of the afternoon with bloody knuckles…”

Thomas Weski: Interview With Cooper Blade

“I think Michael felt the need to discuss the meaning and importance of American photography with a younger generation in Germany who had no experience with these kinds of elderly figures. The National Socialists had either killed or persecuted them in Germany, so for my generation there was no elderly generation in photography.”

David Pace and Stephen Wirtz: Transitional Histories, Transitional Truths. "The ability to disseminate information via photographic images, no matter their actual content, will to representation, or state of factual existence has provided us with what we are currently experiencing in contemporary times as media language and the post-truth image”. Charles Johnstone's Polaroid Memory Screen Tests [...]

John Maclean: The Agony and Ecstasy of Artistic Influence

“In a sense I was trying to complete a circle: I travelled to the neighbourhoods that had some bearing on the childhood development of my art-heroes and consequently on the art they made as adults, and then I tried to photograph these places through the ‘afterimage’ of the artistic influences these works had imparted on me”